To-Do Lists

Crushing a Day

How I say BOOM to this day:
1. Two surprise student consults this morning because their professors told them to come see me specifically.
2. A professor just called in an emergency status, needs some research to support a major NIH grant, thought immediately of me. Yep, I can help with that. Due Thursday? No problem.
3. Finished and submitted a complicated “revise & resubmit” research article to one of the top journals in my field.
4. Chatted with a friend about researching grants for her business idea.
5. Made comments on a group report submitted by one of the groups of students in my experiential learning social justice class.
6. Had a phone call to clear up some things about the library leadership book manuscript.
7. Rejoined the local CSA – 12 biweekly deliveries of a giant box of farm fresh veggies. Back onto the Autoimmune Protocol.
8. Submitted a poetry book manuscript to a press
9. Already located some good sources for #2 – sent 5 articles to the faculty member
10. Bought Urban Decay’s red lipstick in the color “F-Bomb.” Because yeah. Also: on sale. (Thanks, @pigsinspace)
11. Submitted book chapter proposal ““The Mythology of Barbara Gordon’s Body: Intersections of Gendered Violence, Gendered Professions, and Disability”

It’s only 3:35pm and I’ve already kicked this day squah in the ass. Tonight: reading Moby Dick.

Looking at Summer 2015

Things on my librarian brain:

  • Our library team is working on our MOU (Memo of Understanding) in response to the program review we recently had (where outside folks come in and evaluate us). [Side note: in my previous life as an Access Services manager, an MOU was the first step in the disciplinary process of an employee. Not so with this MOU, this is just a normal response with a 2 and 5 year plan to address each item where needs were noted.]
  • Sort of related to the above, the 2015 ACRL Immersion Program has begun! Though I won’t head to Seattle until the beginning of August, the Moodle course is up and running, our readings and pre-assignments have been posted. I’m hoping to leverage the Immersion program to inform how we want our information literacy program to evolve for a growing campus with semistatic resources.
  • A “freemium ” model of peer-review, where authors could pay for faster review of their articles, was pretty much unanimously shot down as privileging moneyed scholars over non-moneyed. It was a trial by Nature Publishing Group to outsource peer-review for authors who could pay the price and were interested in being published faster. What if research funded by private interests is able to pay Gold OA fees and expedited review fees, whereas researchers dependent on academic institutions cannot? Does it matter if research funded by private interests, or more well-to-do universities, can be published faster? There’s still a shred of equality left in peer-reviewed journal article publishing (note I said a thread; I know this area is also fraught with politics and foibles). Is this something librarians are keeping an eye on, and/or talking about?
  • I’ll be working on my Freedom & Justice Studies class in this summer’s GE (General Education) Design & Assessment Institute in early June on campus. Among other things in the day-and-a-half learning opportunity, I hope to better match my assignments to student learning outcomes (I find I can always learn more in this area!) and turn my major class assignment into one of the campus Signature Assignments. The program is limited to 12 slots, so I’m very excited for the opportunity.
  • Submitted a journal article to the Journal of Practical Academic Librarianship, but in re-reviewing it, I think I may have benefited from a more thorough literature review. I’m expecting that one to bounce back, but we’ll see.
  • Completed the preparation work for a new research project with a colleague in the Communication department, and will be bringing the IRB paperwork to my chair so she can sign off on it before it heads to the IRB committee.  We’ll be looking at whether supplemental information literacy material (in the forms of point-of-need tutorials and a discussion board with a librarian) have any impact at all on student research products.